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Sky-high new traffic fines: What you'll pay!

2014-06-10 14:42

‘DETER IRRESPONSIBLE DRIVERS’ The chief magistrate of the Western Cape believes that an increase in road and traffic fines will “no doubt deter” irresponsible and dangerous driving. Image: Shutterstock/Leonard Zhukovsky

UPDATE: Many Wheels24 readers responded with comments ranging from “another toothless act” to calls for "better enforcement of existing laws". Click here to read some of our readers' responses!

CAPE TOWN - Irresponsible drivers will have to pay quite a bit more for traffic offences as the minister of transport and public works, Donald Grant, reports that traffic fines in the Western Cape will increase from August 2014.

The department said: “We welcome this move as it adds weight to the seriousness of these violations, which perpetrators may have previously shrugged off or not taken as seriously as they should.”

According to the department, offences are divided into three categories:

A - Serious offences ranging from R1 500 to R5 000
B - Driving offences ranging from R1 500 to R 3 000
C - Not so serious offences ranging from R500 to R1 500


According to Grant: “We will be adopting a “no-nonsense” enforcement approach to this period (June - August), as we do during the busy festive and Easter periods. Road users must ensure that they are safe and exercise extreme caution during this time.

“They must refrain from dangerous behaviour such as; drinking and driving; speeding, especially on wet and slippery road surfaces with decreased visibility; driving long distances without taking the necessary rest periods; and not being visible while walking on roads. Let us all continue to work together to ensure that we get Safely Home.”

The following fines will increases:

• Falling to stop on demand of a traffic officer  R500 to R1 500
• No driving licence -  R500 to R1 500, HEAVY R2 500
• No **PrDP - R2500, and with passengers R3 000
• Unroadworthy vehicles - R1000 to R3 000
• Unroadworthy bus or minibus - R1 000 to R3 000
• Contrary to discontinue notices - R3 500
• Operator safety issues - R3 000
• Inconsiderate driving - R1 000 to R2 500
• Scholar stop - R500 to R3 000
• Level crossing - R500  to R3 000
• Normal stop - R500 to R1 500, with *PrDP R3 000
• Bus and minibus stop - R500 to R1 500
• Disregarding bus/minibus lane - R500 to R1 500
• No overtaking line - R1 000 to R2 500 and PrDP R3 500
• Skipping traffic lights -  R1 000 to R2 000 and R2 500 for PrDP
• Service brakes -  R500 to R2 500 PrDP

According to the department, offences for overloaded vehicles changed from kilogram categories to a percent rating -  If vehicles are over the 14% to 33% threshold, fines will range from R750 - R5 000 (from R250 and R2 500).

Cut-off for NO AG (admission of guilt) for buses and minibuses was 150km/h reduced to 134km/h and R1 500 fine.

According to the department:“The threat of these fines will no doubt deter errant motorists from engaging in irresponsible and dangerous behaviour on our roads.”

Click here to read the full Western Cape law offence code (pre-August 2014 increase)

*PrDP = Professional driving permit

What do you think of the proposed fine increases? Do you think they will deter irresponsible drivers? What do you think should be done to curb road deaths? Email us and we'll publish your thoughts on Wheels24.

Will traffic fine increases in the Western Cape curb irresponsible driving? Have your say in our home page voting booth!

Read more on:    south africa  |  traffic  |  road safety

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