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2013-07-16 13:16

C-CLASS PROBED: The NHTSA will investigate Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedans built in 2008 (above) and 2009.

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Despite being on the market for relatively short time, Mercedes is working on a minor facelift for its CLS four-door coupe and shooting brake variant.

US safety regulators are investigating 218 000 Mercedes-Benz C-Class models for allegedly faulty rear lights. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) says the probe affects cars produced from 2008 to 2009.

Most C-Class sedans in the US are built at the automaker's East London plant in South Africa.

The agency says it has 21 reports of the brake lights or indicators “dimming or failing to light”. In some cases drivers reported a burning smell or melted electrical components.

‘BOOT FULL OF SMOKE’

Investigators determined whether the problem is widespread enough to warrant a recall, reports the Detroit News. No injuries have been reported.

In a complaint filed with NHTSA in February 2013, an owner said that the dashboard warning lights came on indicating tail light failures. The driver reported that the boot was “full of smoke with the smell of burning plastic.”

The driver told the NHTSA that both bulb-holding assemblies and the electrical connections had been heavily damaged and said the car should be recalled.

MERCEDES-BENZ TO WORK WITH THE NHTSA

Mercedes-Benz told Wheels24: “Daimler AG confirms that an official request has been received by Mercedes-Benz in the US from the NHTSA for an exchange of information, as a result of customer complaints received.

“Daimler will work with the NHTSA on their investigation and further information will be made available regarding the outcome.”

WILL SA BE AFFECTED?

Mercedes-Benz SA's Lynetter Skriker said: "We have to wait for the outcome of the NHTSA investigation as we have no details on what could be causing the issue. We don't want to cause any alarm as it might very well turn out to be nothing at all."




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