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Have Dutch capped gearbox giants?

2013-09-05 14:47

TWO WHEELS, ONE GEARBOX: Four Hollanders have invented what they claim is a gearbox that will for ever change the auto and many other industries. Here's what the basic model looks like, now read the details.... Image: SUPPLIED

BEST, The Netherlands - Four Hollanders claim to have invented, developed and patented a gearbox that could mean a seismic change in the automotive world - one without any gear wheels.

And no, it isn't the same as a constantly variable transmissioins (CVT)... so should the BorgWarners and Getrags of the world be trembling? Or will they just buy the patent and quietly bury the project. Wheels24 will be delighted to hear the views of those who know about such things - and publish them. So Email us.

WATCH THE VIDEO

Compared to traditional transmissions their revolutionary Controlled Rotation System has a simple design, is maintenance-free, doesn't require lubricant and saves fuel because it lacks friction between the gears. It claims to be a sustainable technology.

CARS, BIKES... WINDMILLS

The inventors from the Eindhoven region expect the new transmission to change the automotive industry on a worldwide scale. The system has no gear wheels; it uses two discs powered by a strong belt. With the help of a computer-controlled hydraulic oil pump and "slide units" the diameter of the discs can be increased/decreased, causing acceleration and deceleration, thus providing different "gears".

The new transmission can be applied not only to cars but also to windmills (this is Holland, remember!), ships, motorcycles and all kinds of machines.

The designers said: "This innovation fits perfectly in a green economy. It's easier, more compact and cheaper to assemble than traditional transmissions. It saves energy, offers more gear possibilities and can be used in all kinds of applications.

"The technique is completely different to the traditional gearbox which dates from the 19th century. That's why you can call it revolutionary."

They also deny that the system can be compared with existing constantly-whining, sorry, constantly-variable transmissions. To further develop their ideas and techniques they have founded Parts Services Holland.

'AN END TO GEAR WHEELS'

The system was developed for bicycles after the four got the idea when they saw how cyclist Andy Schleck lost his bicycle chain during the crucial moment of the Tour de France while he was shifting gear.

"Then we thought: 'We should put an end to gear wheels'."

The bicycle the system is called Dual Slide Gear and just two discs replace all the gear wheels normally used.

After developing a prototype for bicycles the system was modified for cars. The automotive prototype measures 30x22x18cm and is most effective in battery cars because the electric motor can run at a constant speed.

By linking each wheel to a separate transmission a lot of energy can be saved.

For more information to Parts Service Holland or call +31-6-53938090 or e-mail contact@partsservicesholland.com

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