Wheels24

Car-jamming: Forget insurance!

2012-01-30 08:09

South African vehicle owners are being hit with thefts of valuables from parked cars as car-jamming gangs target shopping centres and schools.

According to the SAPS, of the 40 cases of theft from vehicles reported in Sandton each week, most involved jamming. Insurance broker Aon South Africa, for instances, has seen a marked increase in "jamming" claims. Spokesperson Kate Lellyet said:

"Car jamming has significant implications from an insurance perspective. The reality is that unless there are signs of forcible or violent entry, most insurance policies will not pay out."

SCHOOLS TARGETED

Jamming involves blocking key-fob central locking devices by using a household remote. Car and household remotes operate at a 400 megahertz frequency and criminals effectively prevent car locking as the driver walks away.

"Schools are being targeted as these are particularly easy pickings for criminals as many parents leave handbags, wallets and laptops in their cars while they walk their children into school," Lellyet said.

SO WHAT TO DO...

Use
the remote locking key WHILE STANDING BY YOUR CAR to make sure it has in fact locked.
Conceal any items left in your vehicle; better, take them with you.
Check that all doors and windows are locked before you walk away.
Park close to a shopping mall entrance.

Comments
  • trevorlbennett - 2012-01-30 09:48

    That's bad, I have tested this multiple times in my vehicle, and it didn't jam my remote signal. This is because many modern systems implement encryption to prevent car thieves from intercepting and spoofing the signal, the receiver unit in the car also ignores signals not intended for the vehicle.

  • ofentse.ramorula - 2012-01-30 11:02

    Also tested my new ford focus with multiple remotes but it ddnt seem to affect the car's remote even at close range.

  • therealunskinny - 2012-01-30 11:21

    "Car jamming has significant implications from an insurance perspective. The reality is that unless there are signs of forcible or violent entry, most insurance policies will not pay out." Assuming they find the stolen car?

      Truthis - 2012-01-30 13:16

      I think they are referring to theft out of the motor vehicle, like laptops etc.

      therealunskinny - 2012-01-30 16:00

      One day I'll learn to read (the entire article). Thanks for clarifying.

  • Jerry - 2012-01-30 12:35

    Those driving Toyota Hilux or Fortuners, be aware, also on the hit list is the BMW E46. I have tested the gate remotes on both these typers if vehicles and it jams them. I had a Hilux stolen from home after owning it for 2 weeks and think someone jammed the locking system. Be aware people, physically check that your vehicle is locked

  • Truthis - 2012-01-30 13:16

    So if I am non-violently mugged and my laptop is stolen, what then? No sign of violence etc.

  • Hector - 2012-01-30 13:52

    "Car jamming has significant implications from an insurance perspective. The reality is that unless there are signs of forcible or violent entry, most insurance policies will not pay out." Eh ?? I go to shop park my car, come back .. car is gone ... insurance won't pay ??? What a crock .. Have you ever seen a lock being opened with a half tennis ball .. no sign of forced entry .. but the lock was forced ... I think this is just an excuse for shirtty insurance companies not to pay out.. boo !!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtZ7jqGzCY8

  • Trevor - 2012-01-30 14:43

    Thanks for the heads up, means when I get to my car and it's gone or items are stolen....But, I did lock the car...here is the key....PROVE I did not...sorry pay up, fact car is gone, fact you insure me fact, unless you can prove otherwise pay, if you push your luck and accuse me of negligence then, you'll have a civil suit and media stink pile on your hands...so...pay up.

      Gerrit - 2012-01-31 14:31

      If the car is stolen it would be almost impossible for them to tell you that you didn't lock the car. Unfortunatly it states in their "terms and conditions" that there has to be forced entry. And yes, they are out to nail you in any way possible, we all know that. I taught myself many years ago (I had a 80's Ford Escourt) to lock the doors with the key and walk around the car to check if the passenger door is locked. With my current car with central locking, I lock the car with the remote and then pull on the door handle to make sure. (And I've had a Toyota with "keyless entry" where you press the button on the door to lock it. The trick is to lock it and immediatly pull on the handle to check if it is locked. If you wait a bit and pull the handle the door unlocks again)

  • Colin - 2012-01-31 15:55

    i have found that my toptv remote interferes with cheap chinese dvd player and vice versa. what Mhz are these operating on? can someone explain, if they can stop you from locking your car, why can't they open your car with the remotes..

  • Ulf - 2012-04-25 18:00

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