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Ricciardo: 'I still have a lot of faith in the team'

2016-06-10 10:49

READY TO GET CRACKING: Daniel Ricciardo admitted to needing a few days away from the Red Bull Racing team after the now-famous Monaco blunder, but said his faith is now restored in his team ahead of the 2016 Canadian GP. Image: AP / The Canadian Press

Montreal, Canada - Daniel Ricciardo admitted on Thursday (June 9) that he needed "a few days" to recover from his 2016 Monaco GP disappointment, but said he has retained his faith in the Red Bull team ahead of this weekend's Canadian grand prix.

The 26-year-old Australian driver added that the team was set to employ new strategy software in a bid to avoid any kind of repeat of the pitstop blunder that cost him victory in Monte Carlo.

Ricciardo, who had started from his maiden pole position in Monaco, led until he pitted for slick tyres - that were not ready for him - after 32 laps and finally came home in second place, 7.2 seconds behind three-times champion Lewis Hamilton.

'I heard what I needed to hear'

Ricciardo told a news conference: "There will be some new software for strategy and live stuff during the race that can make us more prepared and, if there are late calls again, ensure everything is put in place. I had some questions to ask and they (Red Bull) answered them with some confidence and I heard what I needed to hear."

Flanked by two of the sport's veteran drivers in 2007 champion Kimi Raikkonen of Ferrari, and 2009 champion Jenson Button of McLaren, the ambitious Australian cut a much calmer and balanced figure than the frustrated one that left Monaco at the end of May.

READ: Ricciardo - 'It hurts' after Monaco GP pitstop bungle

A photo posted by FORMULA 1® (@f1) on

Ricciardo continued: "I was happy to keep some distance for a few days and, for myself as well, it wasn't probably healthy to address it straight away," confirming that he did not speak to the team after the race.

"For a few days, I was upset I guess. And, obviously, ruing some missed opportunities, but it's one of those things. It happens. It is unfortunate that it happened back to back after Spain," Ricciardo added.

"That expanded the feelings and emotion a lot more, but I have moved on. I still have a lot of faith in the team and I don't doubt things with them moving forward. For me, it is really important this weekend to execute a perfect weekend - we have a good car and good material. It is trying to maximise it.

"The last few weekends, I felt I should have got more. We want to leave on Sunday knowing we have maximised everything from both sides," Ricciardo said.

Horner apologises

Ricciardo explained that he had finally spoken to the team by telephone, after taking a few days to calm down.

The Australian said: "It was all over the phone. I let it cool for a couple of days and then (team principal) Christian (Horner) apologised on everyone's behalf and he explained what went down - and why there was confusion and why the tyres weren't ready.

"So that, really, was the phone call. Then, I spoke to my engineer Simon (Rennie) later in the week, after they had a spent a few days in the factory, to hear what they had put in place, Ricciardo added.

"I questioned the second pitstop, where we lost the race. I questioned the first one as well, as I thought we put ourselves in a race with Lewis (Hamilton) that we didn't need to be in.

READ: Horner on Ricciardo fiasco - Cramped conditions to blame

"He said they weren't looking into it, but acknowledged it was a mistake."

Having expressed his feelings and freed himself of his emotions, Ricciardo said he was ready to bounce back in style this weekend.

"Realistically, I think Mercedes are still the ones to beat, but I hope we can be the next best, Ricciardo concluded.



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